How to remove a tick and prevent future tick bites

Ticks are small, insect-like creatures that live in heavily-wooded or grassy areas. If you walk through these areas, they can attach to your skin and feed on your blood. Although most ticks do not carry disease, some can cause serious illness. To prevent infection, it’s important to remove a tick from your skin as soon as you notice it.

To remove a tick that is attached to your skin, dermatologists recommend the following tips.

Ticks are small, insect-like creatures that live in heavily-wooded or grassy areas. If you walk through these areas, they can attach to your skin and feed on your blood. Although most ticks do not carry disease, some can cause serious illness, such as Lyme disease, Powassan virus, or Rocky Mountain spotted fever. To prevent infection, it’s important to remove a tick from your skin as soon as you notice it.

To remove a tick that is attached to your skin, dermatologists recommend the following tips:

  • Use tweezers to remove the tick.

    Sterilize the tip of the tweezers using rubbing alcohol and grasp the tick as close to the skin’s surface as possible.

  • Pull upward with steady, even pressure.

    Avoid twisting, squeezing or crushing the tick, as this can cause its head or mouth to break off and remain in your skin. If this happens, use tweezers to remove the remaining parts. If you cannot remove the rest of the tick, see a board-certified dermatologist.

  • Dispose of the tick.

    Place it in a sealed bag or container; submerse the tick in alcohol; or wrap it tightly in tape. You may also want to save the tick in a sealed jar. That way, if you develop any symptoms after the bite, the tick can be tested for disease.

  • Clean the bite area with soap and water.

Ticks can bite at any time, however they’re most active in April through September. Fortunately, there are many things people can do to protect themselves and their families against ticks.

To prevent tick bites, dermatologists recommend the following tips:

If you develop any symptoms within a few weeks after a tick bite, such as a rash, fever or body aches, see a board-certified dermatologist. Make sure you tell the doctor about your recent tick bite, when the bite occurred and where you most likely acquired the tick.

Original source https://www.aad.org/public/everyday-care/injured-skin/bites/remove-a-tick